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lr1937
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« on: January 09, 2009, 06:21:22 pm »

how many hours of video can a record on a 320 gigibite hard drive?
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ChadV
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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2009, 08:51:41 am »

The default settings record at approx. 1GB/hr, so 320 hours.

But if you change settings (resolution, bitrate, audio, etc) your bittage may vary.
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zavier.f
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2010, 10:35:32 am »

It really depends on the codec you are using, different cameras use different codecs.

Tape based HDV camcorders use the same data rate as regular minidv, though the footage is compressed using the MPEG2 codec. So 1gb would = 5mins, the same as regular DV. Depending on your computer system you may be better to capture using a format such as Apple Intermediate Codec which will allow faster editing but take up 4x the disc space.

1080P camcorders that use flash or HDD tend to use the AVCHD codec which is more highly compressed than MPEG2 so will take up less space, but at the expense of motion quality and often sharpness.

Your camera handbook should tell you more.
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tkos
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2010, 10:48:34 am »

The OSD is just using one codec, so Chad's response is right.
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pfft2001
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2010, 10:48:50 am »

It really depends on the codec you are using, different cameras use different codecs.

Tape based HDV camcorders use the same data rate as regular minidv, though the footage is compressed using the MPEG2 codec. So 1gb would = 5mins, the same as regular DV. Depending on your computer system you may be better to capture using a format such as Apple Intermediate Codec which will allow faster editing but take up 4x the disc space.

1080P camcorders that use flash or HDD tend to use the AVCHD codec which is more highly compressed than MPEG2 so will take up less space, but at the expense of motion quality and often sharpness.

Your camera handbook should tell you more.

I'm assuming this was posted by a bot, since it is hard to believe that a human poster would be unable to figure out what product is being discussed on this board (and what company is running the board).
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ChadV
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« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2010, 07:48:18 am »

It really depends on the codec you are using, different cameras use different codecs.

Tape based HDV camcorders use the same data rate as regular minidv, though the footage is compressed using the MPEG2 codec. So 1gb would = 5mins, the same as regular DV. Depending on your computer system you may be better to capture using a format such as Apple Intermediate Codec which will allow faster editing but take up 4x the disc space.

1080P camcorders that use flash or HDD tend to use the AVCHD codec which is more highly compressed than MPEG2 so will take up less space, but at the expense of motion quality and often sharpness.

Your camera handbook should tell you more.

I'm assuming this was posted by a bot, since it is hard to believe that a human poster would be unable to figure out what product is being discussed on this board (and what company is running the board).

I'm checking now.  Thanks.  Smiley
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heyrick
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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2010, 04:40:33 pm »

I did some basic calcs for my blog using a 90 minute movie and 128kbit audio, the results were:
    * 256kbit = about 256Mb
    * 512kbit = about 420Mb
    * 768kbit = about 580Mb
    * 1200kbit = about 860Mb
    * 1500kbit = about 1055Mb
    * 2000kbit = about 1370Mb
    * 2500kbit = about 1700Mb

However the reason for my post is that Google is, actually, remarkably versatile in its interpretation of the input. Try asking Google this:
   90 minutes * ((1200 kbps) + (128 kbps))
And you will get the reply:
   90 minutes * ((1200 kbps) + (128 kbps)) = 875.390625 megabytes
The first figure is the video bitrate (compared to my older PVR, 1200kbps is acceptable and doesn't burn through DVD-Rs quite so quickly), the second figure is the audio bitrate.
I'd be inclined to factor in an extra megabyte for "overhead", just to be on the safe side.

I'm not going to work out the duration of stuff that can be recorded on your harddisc for two reasons:
1. Are you sure you'll be recording everything at the same bitrate? My 'default' is 1200kbps. I up this to 1500 or 2000 for things I want to look extra-good, and for disposable programming (stuff I'll watch then delete) I often step down to 768kbps.
2. Is your harddisc really 320Gb? Or is it closer to 298Gb? If it says 320 on it, it is probably 298ish, because for lots of lame reasons lost in time and ill-justified by harddiscs that serve up 512 byte sectors of 8 bits-in-a-byte on a 16/32 bit interface, harddisc capacities use base 10 maths. In other words, 1Mb = 1000Kb, 1Gb = 1000Mb. This allows them to "big up" their sizes, but can really annoy end users when they find the sizes don't match up. For instance, a bit of basic maths wth my calculation above would indicate that the harddisc manufacturers lying to you (I call it lying regardless of excuses as pretty much every other part of a computer uses powers of two) would result in a discrepancy of around 35 hours of recorded material.
Be careful asking your operating system. Windows XP displays binary Gb capacities (i.e. ones you can use with bitrate calculations), while others (Mac OS X..., parts of Linux) display base-10 Gb capacities.

Note: while "giga" is "officially" reserved for base-10 maths, with "gibi" for the binary equivalent, this was an "official" IEC declaration from about 1996. You will find innumerable references to things kilo-, mega-, and even giga- that predates this, not by years but by decades. That's not to say base 10 is wrong, it isn't. What is wrong is using the same prefixes for binary maths, however one simple little decision in the world of officialdom isn't going to fix some fifty years of computer history, and the end user will only suffer when purchasing a 2Gb memory module (which is as big as is expected) and a 500Gb harddisc (which is somewhat smaller than is expected).

This has gone on too long. Can you tell there's nothing interesting on TV right now?  Cheesy
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DT6
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2010, 02:02:05 am »

It depends on your settings.  The resolution the audio and the bitrate may affect your time.  I think the ratio of hour per gb is 1gb/hour.  So i think it will be 320 hours. 
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pfft2001
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2010, 07:14:19 am »

It depends on your settings.  The resolution the audio and the bitrate may affect your time.  I think the ratio of hour per gb is 1gb/hour.  So i think it will be 320 hours. 


It is 1G/hour at the default settings (2500 bit rate).  I've pretty much permanently set the bit rate for my recordings to 1500, and I get about 770M/hour.

Note: The numbers above are in the "what I see" system (i.e., not the undeniably more accurate but harder to use based-on-powers-of-2 system).
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jumpjack
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« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2010, 07:06:52 am »

My Neuros OSD Lite keeps stopping after a few minutes of recording. Have the SD/HD to be completely empty to be used for recording? I'm using devices containing other data, but with plenty of free space still available.
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heyrick
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« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2010, 08:57:10 pm »

From experience of the OSD and a Sandisk 4Gb SD card plus a variety of USB devices (4Gb/8Gb) by Transcend and Ryval... using the OSDng firmware...

...some USB keys abort after about a minute the first time you try to record, but will record subsequent things (both user-assisted and scheduled) without a hitch as long as you leave the same device inserted.

The devices don't need to be empty, for even defragged. My current 8Gb device is three quarters full of recordings and a quarter full of manga scanlations, with stuff being moved on and off a fair bit with no defragging (I don't tend to defrag flash devices, it isn't as if you'll lose time waiting for heads to move!  Smiley ).

Try a device from a different manufacturer. My personal recommendation is a miniature black 4Gb USB flash device made by Transcend - you can see it at http://www.heyrick.co.uk/blog/index.php?diary=20090213 about halfway down. This has stood up to a far bit of abuse with my older PVR, and two are used in rotation with two 8Gb keys on the OSD. Well, when they aren't stuffed into my eeePC for additional storage, that is!
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elad
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« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2011, 09:12:26 pm »

That is strange, I am finding that quite often the first recording will work but subsequent ones will not.

Even had a second recording fail (more specifically it recorded a file but it was not able to be played) but but then lock up the USB slot as it would not eject -
Go to play;browse
then select the USB drive
then xim,
scroll to eject press ok...
xim window dissapears but USB drive is still connected and active.

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